Health Surveillance

Health Care Data Breaches Put the Private Medical Information of Millions of Americans in Jeopardy

Health Care Data Breaches Put the Private Medical Information of Millions of Americans in Jeopardy

ST. PAUL, Minn.—Well over 1 million patients are the latest victims of a huge health care data breach. Just last week, UnityPoint Health notified 1.4 million patients that their records may have been breached when its business system was compromised by a phishing attack, reported Healthcare IT News.

The Watched Are Never Free

The Watched Are Never Free

ST. PAUL, Minn.—It’s impossible for patients and doctors to have an effective relationship when they are being watched. The patient will always try to protect themselves if they think they are being monitored or surveilled, and therefore won’t be entirely open and transparent with their doctor. 

‘Big Brother in the Exam Room’ Now Available! New Book from Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom Gives Action Steps for Restoring Freedom

‘Big Brother in the Exam Room’ Now Available! New Book from Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom Gives Action Steps for Restoring Freedom

ST. PAUL, Minn.Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF) has released a new, groundbreaking book that could change the way both patients and doctors think about the exam room experience.

 

AVAILABLE TODAY: CCHF Launches New Book 'Big Brother in the Exam Room' at FreedomFest

AVAILABLE TODAY: CCHF Launches New Book 'Big Brother in the Exam Room' at FreedomFest

ST. PAUL, Minn.—Health care has already found its way into the narrative surrounding President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, announced less than 48 hours ago. But regardless of how SCOTUS may impact future health care policy, there are real threats to patientstoday, including third-party controls over care, surveillance, data collection and privacy invasions—much of it through electronic health record (EHR) systems found in a majority of doctor’s offices and hospitals around the country.

3 Privacy Concerns Patients May Not Know About

3 Privacy Concerns Patients May Not Know About

ST. PAUL, Minn.Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF) is alerting Americans to three privacy issues they may not know anything about.

CCHF president and co-founder Twila Brase says these three health care news items are just a sampling of the many ways the government and the health care industry are attempting to use patient data—often without consent—for their own gain.

Revised Common Rule Strips Parents of Consent Rights Regarding Baby DNA Used for Research

Revised Common Rule Strips Parents of Consent Rights Regarding Baby DNA Used for Research

ST. PAUL, Minn.As things stand, in just over two months parents will lose their consent rights for the use of their newborn baby’s DNA for federally funded research, once the revised Common Rule goes into effect on July 19, 2018.

 

CCHF Connects with Lawmakers on Patient Privacy, Opioid Crisis

CCHF Connects with Lawmakers on Patient Privacy, Opioid Crisis

‘Jessie’s Law’ Would Impact Patient Rights, Privacy and Access to Timely and Essential Medical Care, While Opioid Crisis Response Act Would Create Severe Shortage of Medications for Injured Who Are Deprived of Pain Relief

CCHF Letter to Walden, Burgess, & Barton regarding Jessie's Law

CCHF Letter to Walden, Burgess, & Barton regarding Jessie's Law

We are concerned about the impact of this legislation on patient rights, patient privacy, and patient access to timely and essential medical care. We request that the legislation NOT be passed.

Parents Sue Michigan for Stolen Blood (“Baby DNA”)

Parents Sue Michigan for Stolen Blood (“Baby DNA”)

The Michigan BioTrust for Health is storing newborn DNA for 100 years. Philip Ellison, the father of a newborn, is an attorney whose job is to sue the government. He got nine other families together in a federal lawsuit. And he sued the state health department and the biobank. His special web page: stolenblood.comFor more on issue: itsmydna.org

Congress Moving Ahead to Take Away Privacy & Consent in Matters of Substance Abuse

Congress Moving Ahead to Take Away Privacy & Consent in Matters of Substance Abuse

ST. PAUL, Minn.—Patient privacy, when it comes to sensitive medical information, is almost a thing of the past—thanks to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) “no-privacy rule,” says Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF). But one area that has remained private is data concerning substance abuse, currently kept separate from most medical records to protect patients.