New15 REASONS: Oppose Obamaʼs Health Insurance Exchanges (HIX)

15 REASONS: Oppose Obamaʼs Health Insurance Exchanges (HIX)
There are at least 15 reasons to oppose Obama's Health Insurance Exchanges (HIX). A few are:
1) Exchanges are the "federal takeover centers" of Obamacare
2) Exchanges are a national registration and enforcement system for the IRS.
3) Exchanges will cost states $10 million - $100 million per year in operating costs.

Who Defines “Fraud, Waste, and Abuse”?

Who Defines “Fraud, Waste, and Abuse”?

This document contains a sample of the various definitions of the terms “Fraud, Waste, and Abuse” from government agencies and health plans. There are more. The lack of a concrete definition in law should give pause as cost containment initiatives increase. Here are a few questions to consider:

2011 Minnesota Legislature - Activities, Testimonies, and Information

CCHC Analysis of Massachusetts "Universal Coverage" Bill

Massachusetts' “universal coverage” legislation with the "Connector" mimics the government bureaucracy and bureaucratic controls of the 1993 Clinton Health Security Act and the 2011 so-called Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

Analysis of Plan to Abolish State Medical Privacy Laws - HR 4157

“This legislation will make sure the national health IT coordinator’s post is a permanent one, and it will overcome some of the key obstacles that have slowed our progress toward adoption of a national, interoperable electronic system” (Rep. Nancy Johnson, Press Release, October 27, 2005).

MinnesotaCare is a Welfare Program

Coverage for inhospital expenses are limited to $10,000 for adults with higher incomes. There is no catastrophic insurance coverage for these adults. Adults risk transfer into Medical Assistance.

Medicaid - History

A federal government document showing the history and growth of Medicaid, beginning in 1965.

Want a Nurse? Get in Line!

Hospitals and nursing facilities across the nation are severely short-staffed. So heard legislators at the Minnesota Workforce Task Force in December. In fact, at one point in the previous two months, four Minnesota hospitals were closed for discretionary admissions at the same time because there was not enough staff to care for patients, according to the Minnesota Nurses Association.

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