Watch Out for Apple Watch Privacy Intrusions

 

***NEWS RELEASE***

 

For Immediate Release
November 16, 2015

 

CONTACT:
Deborah Hamilton, Hamilton Strategies, 215.815.7716, 610.584.1096, ext. 102, or Beth Harrison, 610.584.1096, ext. 104,Media@HamiltonStrategies.com

 

Watch Out for Apple Watch Privacy Intrusions

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom Says This Hot Holiday Gift Has Health Information Privacy Concerns That Come With It
 

ST. PAUL, Minn.—The Christmas shopping season is well underway, with consumers already considering which gifts to buy for their loved ones, making their Black Friday shopping lists and maybe even adding something to their own wish lists.

Undoubtedly, one hot gift will be the Apple Watch, which seeks to bring together many technological aspects of a person’s life in one device—answer emails, make phone calls, send texts, see travel information, reserve a car, pay for purchases and, of course, get the time.

Many more use the Apple Watch for its fitness tracking capabilities and health monitoring. But beware, says Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF, www.cchfreedom.org), a patient-centered national health freedom organization based in St. Paul, Minn., existing to protect health care choices, individualized patient care, and medical and genetic privacy rights. Communicating private health information through a device like the Apple Watch may mean sharing that data with many more than watch-wearers bargained for.

For example, this fall, Apple made an announcement about a modification to its watch, stating that the new app from AirStrip will allow wearers to send their heart-rate data directly to their doctors. The company presenter claimed doctors will then be able to “send a HIPAA-compliant secure message to a member of the patientʼs care team.”

“People wrongly think HIPAA protects privacy—but it does not,” said CCHF president and co-founder Twila Brase. “‘HIPAA-compliant’ does not equal privacy, even though almost everyone thinks it does. HIPAA actually opens your medical record to countless outsiders, meaning that many, including government officials, can now see and use our data without our consent. The deception about the federal HIPAA privacy rule runs broad, wide and deep. So think carefully how you use the Apple Watch and other devices like it, even if they are ‘HIPAA-compliant.’”

Just last week in an exclusive interview with the UK’s Telegraph, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that Apple had no plans to turn the Apple Watch into a medical device, but in fact, may have a whole new product in mind for that purpose.

“Cook hints that Apple may have more plans for the health sphere, in a revelation which will intrigue Wall Street, but he doesn’t want the watch itself to become a regulated, government-licensed health product,” The Telegraph reported. “‘We don’t want to put the watch through the Food and Drug Administration process (Cook said). I wouldn’t mind putting something adjacent to the watch through it, but not the watch, because it would hold us back from innovating too much, the cycles are too long. But you can begin to envision other things that might be adjacent to it—maybe an app, maybe something else.’”

So it’s clear, Brase said, that the technological world is very interested in merging with health and fitness data-sharing, which could open up brand new privacy issues for patients and consumers.

Brase recently talked about the privacy issues surrounding the Apple Watch during CCHF’s daily, 60-second Health Freedom Minute radio feature. Heard on 367 stations nationwide, including 200 on the American Family Radio Network and 100 on the Bott Radio Network, Health Freedom Minute helps listeners learn more about the agenda behind health care initiatives, as well as steps they can take to protect their health care choices, rights and privacy. 

Recent Health Freedom Minute topics have also included health care sharing organizations, refusing to enroll in Obamacare, the new ICD-10 medical coding system, patient profiling, hospital fraud, medical data privacy, patient outcomes and socialized medicine. The one-minute program is free for stations to run; for details, contact Michael Hamilton at mhamilton@hamiltonstrategies.com or (610) 584-1096 or (215) 519-4838.

For more information about CCHF, visit its web site at www.cchfreedom.org, its Facebook page at www.facebook.com/cchfreedom or its Twitter feed, @CCHFreedom.

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom, a patient-centered national health freedom organization based in St. Paul, Minn., exists to protect health care choices, individualized patient care, and medical and genetic privacy rights. CCHF sponsors the daily, 60-second radio feature, Health Freedom Minute, which airs on approximately 350 stations nationwide, including 200 on the American Family Radio Network and 100 on the Bott Radio Network. Listeners can learn more about the agenda behind health care initiatives and​ steps they can take to protect their health care choices, rights and privacy. 

CCHF president and co-founder Twila Brase, R.N., has been called one of the “100 Most Powerful People in Health Care” and one of “Minnesota’s 100 Most Influential Health Care Leaders.” A public health nurse, Brase has been interviewed by CNN, Fox News, Minnesota Public Radio, NBC Nightly News, NBC’s Today Show, NPR, New York Public Radio, the Associated Press, Modern Healthcare, TIME, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Washington Times, among others. She is at the forefront of informing the public of crucial health issues, such as intrusive wellness and prevention initiatives in Obamacare, patient privacy, informed consent, the dangers of “evidence-based medicine” and the implications of state and federal health care reform.
 

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For more information or to interview Twila Brase, president and co-founder of Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom, contact Deborah Hamilton at 215-815-7716 or 610-584-1096, or Beth Harrison at 610-584-1096, Media@HamiltonStrategies.com.

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