Health Care Reform - Obamacare

Senate Votes to Repeal Parts of Obamacare

Senate Votes to Repeal Parts of Obamacare

ST. PAUL, Minn. - Late last evening, the U.S. Senate voted 52-47 in favor of the Republican-backed bill, the Restoring Americans’ Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act (H.R. 3762), which repeals parts of the Affordable Care Act and cuts millions of dollars from the Planned Parenthood budget, according to the Associated Press.

Proposed Senate "Obamacare Repeal" Amendment

Proposed Senate 'Obamacare Repeal' Amendment

Today, the U.S. Senate proposes to amend H. R. 3762 to "repeal" additional sections of the Affordable Care Act beyond the sections that the U.S. House proposes to repeal using the budget reconciliation process. The entire law would not be repealed. Budget reconciliation procedures mean the "repeal" is actually a 7-year suspension of various taxes, including the 40% 'Cadillac tax,' zeroing out of the individual and employer mandate penalties (while not repealing the language), ending the risk corridor and reinsurance (corporate welfare/bailout) programs, and phasing out the expansion of Medicaid and taxpayer-funded premium subsidies. If enacted and signed into law, the bill would be a blow to the financial solvency of the law, but would not repeal many ACA provisions which impede on individualized medical decision-making between patients and doctors, such as "value-based" purchasing, Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), the Independent Payment Advisory Board and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. [UPDATED with 20-page Senate amendment on Friday, December 4, 2015]

Deputizing Doctors

Deputizing Doctors

Americans need to see “population health” for what it really is. Last week, a POLITICO panel discussed the term “population health,” which is key to Obamacare’s transformation away from the private practice of medicine -- and into the everyday lives of Americans – starting with Medicare. 

Think Twice Before ‘Shopping’ 
for Health Care on Black Friday

Think Twice Before ‘Shopping’ 
for Health Care on Black Friday

ST. PAUL, Minn.—Just last week, one of the major health insurers, UnitedHealth Group, announced it may pull out of Obamacare exchanges in 2017, citing rising costs and enrollment numbers well below projections.

The First Shoe Drops:  
UnitedHealth Group Considers Obamacare Exit

The First Shoe Drops:  
UnitedHealth Group Considers Obamacare Exit

ST. PAUL, Minn. - Just a few hours ago, news broke that UnitedHealth Group, one of the country’s largest health insurers, may cease offering coverage through Obamacare exchanges - a move that could have far-reaching effects on the already faltering government health care system.

 

Three Legal Alternatives

Three Legal Alternatives

Twila Brase, patient advocate and co-founder of Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom, says there are better, smarter—and perfectly legal—alternatives to enrolling in Obamacare. Brase offers these three legal alternatives to enrolling in Obamacare:

 

 

Carly Got it Backwards

Carly Got it Backwards

Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina, had great things to say about free markets in health care at the recent November GOP debate, until this:

CCHF Comment: Nondiscrimination in Health Programs and Activities; Proposed Rule

CCHF Comment: Nondiscrimination in Health Programs and Activities; Proposed Rule

PUBLIC COMMENT SUBMITTED: CCHF opposes the “Nondiscrimination in Health Programs and Activities; Proposed Rule." "Despite the subjectivity of the proposed “internal sense of gender” definition -- and no statutory authority to back up the imposition of an unnatural definition of ‘sex’ and sure-to-be-controversial nondiscrimination prohibitions – HHS proposes to potentially force physicians … "

Refuse to Enroll


Refuse to Enroll


ST. PAUL, Minn.—For more than five years, Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF, www.cchfreedom.org) has been urging Americans to “refuse to enroll” in Obamacare.

 

Scary Business

Scary Business

On Friday, the Obama administration published a final rule on physician payment for 2016. The 1,358-page Medicare rule, with the names of 28 bureaucrats you can contact with questions, makes changes to physician payment and Medicare Part B. A similar rule will be issued next year for 2017 and likely every year after.  Who has time to read these??